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On This Day: a thread about stuff that happened on this day in history

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  • The limited edition 1969.5 Hurst SC/Rambler made its debut at the Chicago Auto Show on March 8, 1969.

    ED8A8DEC-5E99-4BBE-B5BB-E2662466A007.jpeg


    S2K Days Attendee: Belterra, IN - 07 | Lake George, NY - 08 | San Francisco, CA - 09 | Asheville, NC - 10 | Keystone, SD - 11 | Golden, CO - 12 | Atlanta, GA - 13 | Hood River, OR - 14 | Cumberland Falls, KY - 15 | Durango, CO - 16 | Fredericksburg, TX - 17 | SoCal, CA - 18

    Where have you driven your S2000?

    Comment


    • D585ADC7-60B5-4740-9444-33502D23D5D3.png
      S2K Days Attendee: Belterra, IN - 07 | Lake George, NY - 08 | San Francisco, CA - 09 | Asheville, NC - 10 | Keystone, SD - 11 | Golden, CO - 12 | Atlanta, GA - 13 | Hood River, OR - 14 | Cumberland Falls, KY - 15 | Durango, CO - 16 | Fredericksburg, TX - 17 | SoCal, CA - 18

      Where have you driven your S2000?

      Comment


      • March 14

        Albert Einstein's birthday, 1879.

        Also PI DAY! Go have some pie to celebrate. Pie improves everything.
        ***
        -Roseanne

        "Wait... r.murphy isn't a dude?"
        California Dreamin'


        ***


        Comment


        • March 18

          1965
          Soviet cosmonaut Aleksey Arkhipovich Leonov, after passing through an air lock on the spacecraft Voskhod 2, became the first man to walk in space.


          1766
          The British Parliament repealed the Stamp Act of 1765 after violent protests from American colonists, including a group known as the Sons of Liberty.
          ***
          -Roseanne

          "Wait... r.murphy isn't a dude?"
          California Dreamin'


          ***


          Comment


          • March 21

            On this day in 1960, F1 Champ Ayrton Senna was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil.



            Also on this day, in 1965:

            Martin Luther King, Jr. begins the march from Selma to Montgomery

            In the name of African-American voting rights, 3,200 civil rights demonstrators in Alabama, led by Martin Luther King Jr., begin a historic march from Selma to Montgomery, the state’s capital. Federalized Alabama National Guardsmen and FBI agents were on hand to provide safe passage for the march, which twice had been turned back by Alabama state police at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge.

            In 1965, King and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) decided to make the small town of Selma the focus of their drive to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Alabama’s governor, George Wallace, was a vocal opponent of the African-American civil rights movement, and local authorities in Selma had consistently thwarted efforts by the Dallas County Voters League and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to register local blacks.

            Although Governor Wallace promised to prevent it from going forward, on March 7 some 500 demonstrators, led by SCLC leader Hosea Williams and SNCC leader John Lewis, began the 54-mile march to the state capital. After crossing Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were met by Alabama state troopers and posse men who attacked them with nightsticks, tear gas and whips after they refused to turn back.

            Several of the protesters were severely beaten, and others ran for their lives. The incident was captured on national television and outraged many Americans.

            King, who was in Atlanta at the time, promised to return to Selma immediately and lead another attempt. On March 9, King led another marching attempt, but turned the marchers around when state troopers again blocked the road.

            On March 21, U.S. Army troops and federalized Alabama National Guardsmen escorted the marchers across Edmund Pettus Bridge and down Highway 80. When the highway narrowed to two lanes, only 300 marchers were permitted, but thousands more rejoined the Alabama Freedom March as it came into Montgomery on March 25.

            On the steps of the Alabama State Capitol, King addressed live television cameras and a crowd of 25,000, just a few hundred feet from the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where he got his start as a minister in 1954.
            ***
            -Roseanne

            "Wait... r.murphy isn't a dude?"
            California Dreamin'


            ***


            Comment

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