Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Good news for Wisconsin!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Good news for Wisconsin!

    Wisconsin Senate Votes To Pull Plug On Automatic Gas Tax Hike
    By Dale Schultz
    CSP Daily News
    December 8, 2005


    Madison, Wisconsin - The Wisconsin Senate has approved legislation (SB 331) to end in 2007 the state’s annual automatic increase in the gasoline tax. The bill would also move up by one month a planned one-cent cut in the portion of the tax that goes toward environmental cleanup projects.

    Some lawmakers have pushed unsuccessfully for years to end the automatic yearly increase for inflation that began in 1985. But support for the measure grew following high gasoline prices this summer and swelled after the issue became a hot topic among voters, talk radio and bloggers.

    The top two Senate Republicans initially opposed the bill, but ended up voting for it Tuesday, while the top member of the Assembly promised a vote next week after initial expressing some reservations about the bill.

    Supporters said the current system represents taxation without representation. “Do we stand on our desks and vote aye in favor of a gas tax increase or no against the tax increase, or do we continue to cower under our desks and allow a formula to work for us?” said State Senator Mike Ellis (R).

    Opponents countered the bill would shortchange the $3.2 billion transportation fund by $5.1 million in the two-year budget that began July 1. They said the likely cuts would come at the expense of rural districts, delaying needed road projects. “Identify what you want to cut first before you start cutting like this,” said State Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D).

    The Senate voted 20 to 13 to approve the bill, which next goes to the Assembly. If that chamber approves it, the bill would next go to Governor Jim Doyle for his review.

    As reported in CSP Daily News, Doyle spokesperson Dan Leistikow said the governor would consider any measure lawmakers sent to his desk, but wanted assurances the legislation would maintain needed funding for safe roads.

    Wisconsin’s gasoline tax—now 29.9 cents a gallon plus three cents a gallon added on to clean up old gas stations and other environmental projects—is already one of the highest in the country.

    The bill would eliminate indexing after the increase slated for April 1, when the tax is scheduled to increase 0.8 cents a gallon.

    Lawmakers and the governor had already approved cutting a penny from the portion of the tax that goes toward environmental cleanup projects on May 1. The bill would move that up to April 1. The net impact would be a 0.2-cent decrease in the taxes motorists pay beginning April 1, while the 2007 increase—and those planned in future years—would be wiped out. Moving up the penny reduction would cut about $3.2 million from the Petroleum Environmental Cleanup Fund Award.

    Assembly Speaker John Gard (R) said that chamber will vote on the bill next week. Gard has raised concerns that the $5.1 million cut in the transportation fund could delay road projects. He said lawmakers will work on a long-term solution to those concerns and expected the bill to pass.

    “The time has come to end indexing,” Gard said.

    The issue cut across party lines and the debate featured the unusual situation of pitting Senate Majority Leader Dale Schultz (R) against much of the Republican caucus. Schultz had publicly vowed to vote against the bill leading up to Tuesday’s vote. But he changed course during debate and urged his colleagues to amend the legislation to eliminate the planned increase in the gasoline tax for 2006 as well.

    He said if lawmakers were sincere about eliminating indexing, they should do it now rather than waiting another year. Doing so would have increased the price tag for the proposal to more than $38 million out of the transportation fund. That drew protests from fellow Republicans that the proposal was fiscally irresponsible. Lawmakers rejected Schultz’s amendment and instead amended the bill to move up the PECFA cut.

    “I think my colleagues were sending me a solid signal,” Schultz said afterward.

    Copyright 2005 CSP Information Group. All rights reserved.
    "Blue Oh-Two" (#424)
    Rick's header, Hondata gasket, Mugen thermostat/fan switch, Mugen radiator cap, Aussie mirror, Lucid's rear speakers, Alpine CDA-7893R & KCE-865B, Muz's saddlebag, Windscreen Light, Modifry's glove box organizer and lots of Zaino!


  • #2
    Who is the winner in this, aside from the politicians?


    S2KCA - The S2000 Club of America

    Comment


    • #3
      Body shops and mechanics who will have to repair the pothole damage and fix the bodies of cars who slide all over in our miserable winter weather. Oh, maybe doctors and clinics who have to repair the people as they slide into each other due to lack of road maintence [(plowing etc).

      Comment


      • #4
        Good call. Lawyers always win, so I'd include them too.


        S2KCA - The S2000 Club of America

        Comment


        • #5
          By the way, where in Cheeseland do you reside?


          S2KCA - The S2000 Club of America

          Comment


          • #6
            I live in the city that is often refered to as fortyseven square miles surrounded by reality It's short nickname is Mad Town. as in madison. you't think that there would be enough S2000 owners in this area to start a central Wi chapter. I asked once before and did'nt get one reply, so one more time. Lets get together and discuss pros & cons. ok?

            Comment


            • #7
              There's not many cheeseheads outside of Milwaukee that are really active. I've met a few Madison owners but most come and go.


              I grew up in Oshkosh, by the way... thus my interest.


              S2KCA - The S2000 Club of America

              Comment


              • #8
                In todays paper some pundit figured that the average family with two cars would save about $6.35 per year if the gas tax is not increased by indexing the tax to inflation. The polititions are all jumping on the band wagon because nobody has the guts to tell it like it is. Govs up for reelection next year too. I don't understand how people can like having roads that are less safe and feel good about saving nearly 3.25 per car per year. All they hear is tax cut and like Pavlov's dogs they start to salivate. I guess we really are cheesheads or at least we've got our heads stuck far and firmly up ours asses.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wisconsin To Nix Gasoline Tax Indexing
                  By Spencer Kelly
                  Oil Price Information Service
                  December 19, 2005


                  Speculation ended today with word that Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle (D) intends to sign recently passed legislation that will end the state's automatic gasoline tax changes through annual indexation to the rate of inflation.

                  The governor had been lukewarm on a bill approved by lawmakers earlier this month to end what has been, in essence, an automatic annual increase in the state's gasoline tax. But rising support among the public and a lopsided vote in the legislature helped turn the balance in favor of the measure to end indexing in 2007. With the governor's signature, the last automatic increases will be the 0.8cts/gal already scheduled for this April 1, 2006.

                  The new tax law would require legislators to actually vote to approve any increase in state gasoline taxes. Wisconsin currently taxes gasoline at 29.9cts/gal, with another 3cts/gal tacked on for the state environmental cleanup fund. The tax bill would also move a previously approved 1cts/gal cut in the cleanup fund tax by a month, to next April 1.

                  Wisconsin has indexed its gasoline tax to inflation for two decades and several previous attempts to end the practice failed. The spike in gasoline prices this year provided growing impetus to end the practice and it passed easily in both houses of the state legislature, gaining Assembly approval late last week by a final 74-23 vote.

                  "I simply do not believe it is appropriate to raise taxes every year automatically, without elected officials having to stand up and be accountable to the people paying the taxes," said Doyle in announcing his decision today to sign the bill.

                  The governor was not altogether supportive when the bill initially passed, noting it will mean $5.1 million less in transportation improvement funding in the state's 2-year budget. Road-building groups also opposed an end to indexing because it would mean less funds for road improvement, a sentiment for which the Doyle had expressed some sympathy.

                  Copyright 2005, Oil Price Information Service.
                  "Blue Oh-Two" (#424)
                  Rick's header, Hondata gasket, Mugen thermostat/fan switch, Mugen radiator cap, Aussie mirror, Lucid's rear speakers, Alpine CDA-7893R & KCE-865B, Muz's saddlebag, Windscreen Light, Modifry's glove box organizer and lots of Zaino!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by WestSideBilly
                    There's not many cheeseheads outside of Milwaukee that are really active. I've met a few Madison owners but most come and go.


                    I grew up in Oshkosh, by the way... thus my interest.
                    West Side Billy, I grew up in Wisconsin Rapids, just about 80 miles from you. Another person who knows what a "bubbler" is!!!
                    "The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has it's limits."

                    Albert Einstein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I took a lot of heat about that when I went to college in the UP... I asked where the bubbler was and a few people responded "the WHAT?" :LOL:


                      S2KCA - The S2000 Club of America

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X